Private Warren Howard “Midge” Mack, Service Number 34719032

Warren was born in Johnson City, Washington County, Tennessee on 19 March 1925. He attended two years at Langston High School before enlisting in the United States Army on 31 July 1943. He was assigned to the 3203rd Quartermaster Service Company, 24th Quartermaster Battalion, 559th Quartermaster Group, 9th United States Army.

Before redeployment to France on 5 September 1944, his unit was stationed at Burton-on-Trent, Staffordshire, England. After the 9th secured the port town of Brest, France, they started their move east along with the 3rd United States Army. On 14 March 1945, just five days short of Warren’s 20th birthday, he was shot and killed in the town of Dulken, North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany. Warren served in two unit campaigns, Northern France and the Rhineland.

Warren was initially laid to rest in the United States Military Cemetery at Margraten, Holland. He was placed in Plot T, Row 6, Grave 140 at 0900 hours on 17 March 1945. Warren’s disinterment occurred on 22 July 1948 and his journey home began. He arrived Johnson City via the railway, Southern #46 at 0952 hours on 2 November 1948 and was reinterred at 1400 hours at West Lawn Cemetery, Johnson City, Tennessee.

He was the son of Vatin Mack a United States Army, World War I veteran and Dorothy Ann Brown, an ordained minister.

Note: Warren’s grave marker was placed on 26 May 2011 and a full military service conducted on 28 May 2011. Something that should have been done 62 years ago… Welcome Home Warren!!!
-Submitted by Allen D. Jackson, USAF (Ret)

Pvt. Warren Howard Mack, who died in Dulken, Germany, on March 14, 1945, five days before he would have turned 20.

Born in Johnson City on March 19, 1925, to Vatin Mack and Dorothy Ann Brown, Mack enlisted in the Army in July 1943. His father was a World War I veteran and his mother was an ordained minister at New Mt. Hope Fire Baptized Holiness Church on West Eighth Avenue.

He attended Langston High School, Johnson City’s school for black children until integration took place in the city. Mack excelled at sports and woodworking.

Mack arrived in France on Sept. 5, 1944, and moved with the 9th and 3rd armies into the Rhineland of Germany, where he died.

His wound was not received from battle, though Mack probably saw plenty of combat. His death was likely the result of friendly fire, as the Army listed his cause of death as a non-battle gunshot. The circumstances were not clear.

According to Army records, Mack was interred in the U.S. Military Cemetery at Margraten, Holland, on March 17, 1945. He was disinterred July 22, 1948, and sent home. Mack’s body arrived in Johnson City by train on the morning of Nov. 2 that year. He was buried again at 2 p.m. that day.

Above Information from Johnson City Press article “Finding Private Mack, WWII soldier’s discovered in city cemetery,” published May 24, 2011, by Rex Barber.

 

Warren Howard Mack was born in Johnson City, Tennessee on 19 March 1925. He was the son of Vatin Mack and Dorothy Ann Brown, an ordained minister. Vatin was a veteran of World War I having served with the United States Army. Dorothy ministered at the New Mt. Hope Fire Baptized Holiness Church just down West Eight Avenue where they lived and Warren played and grew up.

From what I’ve gathered, Warren was a happy go lucky lad that really enjoyed life, playing sports and woodworking. He was small in stature, but big of heart and his family’s pet name for him was Midge, short for midget, which he wasn’t, but siblings can be mean at times. He attended school and had completed two years at Langston High before enlisting in the United States Army on 31 July 1943. After basics, he was assigned to the 3203rd Quartermaster Service Company, 24th Quartermaster Battalion, 559th Quartermaster Group. Shortly thereafter they sailed for England.

Before redeployment to France on 5 September 1944, his unit was stationed at Burton-on-Trent, Staffordshire, England and assigned to the 9th United States Army. After arriving in France the 9th Army secured the port town of Brest before beginning their drive east along with the 3rd United States Army. On 14 March 1945, just five days short of Warren’s 20th birthday, he was shot and killed in the town of Dulken, North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany. He served in two unit campaigns, Northern France and the Rhineland.

Warren was interred in the United States Military Cemetery at Margraten, Holland. He was placed in Plot T, Row 6, Grave 140 at 0900 hours on 17 March 1945. Warren’s disinterment occurred on 22 July 1948 and his journey home began. He arrived Johnson City via the railway, Southern #46 at 0952 hours on 2 November 1948. Warren was met by Mr. J.D. Ledford from the Ledford Funeral Home. The escort was told that there was to be no military honors given for Warren and that he was to be buried at 1400 hours today at West Lawn Cemetery and he was free to return to Atlanta, Georgia. The escort contacted his superior and informed him of the circumstances and was told to go ahead and return.

In January of 1949, a bronze military marker was placed on Warren’s grave. Sadly, just after that his grave was vandalized and the marker stolen. A replacement marker was said to have been ordered years later by the Ledford Funeral Home, but it never arrived. So, Warren’s grave has been unmarked for nearly 62 years, but that ended at 1100 hours on 28 May 2011 with a dedication and memorial service with full military honors this time. His sister Delila Mack Sparks and her husband John attended. Also in attendance was Warren’s childhood friend Mr. Hugh Collie who served in the United States Army during World War II.

WELCOME HOME WARREN!!! Thank you for your service to us and our nation.

Nothing Is Ever Truly Forgotten!!! We Remember…

–Submitted by Allen D. Jackson, USAF (Ret)

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